BBPI In The Media!

We believe that scientists have no greater responsibility than to communicate their work, sharing their discoveries to inspire others in the pursuit of knowledge.
 

We don't seek the "limelight" . . . 

. . . but we understand that it is an opportunity to educate, inform, and inspire - all responsibilities at the heart of our mission.  

The BBPI's research and field work has garnered a great deal of attention recently, and there's certainly a lot more on the way.  Check this page often to see how and where we're making a splash!  

Looking for the BBPI's latest news & notes?

The best way to keep up with us is with the Member's-only newsletter.  Become a Member today!

 

August 2017

Expedition Leaders Jason Schein and Jason Poole were the featured guests of MusicRanchRadio's Independant Artist Spotlight!  We had an amazing time hanging out with Greg "the Rockstar" Creasy and Big Jim talking about fossils, dinosaurs, and paleontology in the Bighorn Basin!  

You can listen to the whole hour by clicking HERE.  


october 2016

The Fall 2006 issue of Academy Frontiers - a publication of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University - included several features about the 2016 Field Expedition and the team's excavation of the type specimen of Suuwassea emilieae, a rare sauropod from the Late Jurassic (145 mya) Morrison Formation of southern Montana.

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September 2016

Discover Magazine's September 2016 issue included a short feature on the BBPI's Executive Director, Jason Schein, and the field team's re-discovery of the type specimen of Suuwassea emilieae, a rare sauropod from the Late Jurassic (145 mya) Morrison Formation of southern Montana.


July 2016

CNN's The Great Big Story joined us during the 2016 Field Expedition hoping to learn how paleontology and paleontological field work - typically done with shovels, pick axes, and good old fashioned brute force - are being transformed by technology.  


2012

One of the most incredible stories in the history of paleontology: the discovery of two halves of the type specimen of Atlantochelys - a giant Cretaceous sea turtle - more than 160 years and several miles apart.  Truly astounding!